ANN PARKER

BOTANICAL METAMORPHICS by ANN PARKER
FALL SHOW: SEPTEMBER 14 - 27
53 Church Street, Lenox, MA
Open daily 11-5pm

ANN PARKER
Photographer, Writer, Graphic Designer

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Yale University, Department of Graphic Arts 1954 -1956 (BFA)
Rhode Island School of Design, Painting Department 1952-1954
Also studied privately for 3 months with Minor White, Rochester, NY 1955,
Lisette Model, The New School 1961, Josef Breitenbach, The New School 1962
PHOTOGRAPHS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS: (selection)
George Eastman House, Rochester, NY
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,
NY Center of Creative Photography, Tucson, AZ
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA
Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
Helmut Gernsheim Collection, Lugano, Switzerland
Boston Public library, Boston, MA
Princeton University Library, Princeton, NJ
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Brown University Library, Providence, RI
Amherst College, Amherst, MA.
American University in Cairo, Faculty Room, New Cairo, Egypt

GENE + SUSAN FLORES

SUMMER SHOW
Gene + Susan Flores

SHOW OPENING: SATURDAY, AUGUST 24
R E C E P T I O N
Saturday, August 24th

4-6pm 4forART Gallery

GENE MONTEZ FLORES

Gene Montez Flores In 1957 I was a 22-year-old barista at the Hidden Village Coffee House in Monterey, California, owned by Cuban artist Pio Junco, who gave me my first welding torch, a few hand tools, and his belief in me. In Bauhaus style, I worked perfecting the art of flame cutting with the delicacy of a sumi brush, convinced fire and steel were my palette. I made decorative work, architectural commissions, jewelry, furniture, toys, non-objective and kinetic sculptures, figurative pieces, light fixtures, chandeliers, and candelabras in steel.

I had grown up at the edge of the Mojave desert and camped solo as a teen in the mountains overlooking the vast valley. Later, with my young family, we bought land and built a cabin in the high desert near the town of Tehachapi, followed by ten years in Santa Cruz CA. It was only when we moved to the warehouse district in lower Manhattan in 1979 that my memories and emotions about the desert landscape emerged and I began the work I still continue.

SUSAN FLORES

Susan Flores In 1962 I was 22 years old and fell in love in the first minute on the first day as we drank coffee at the Kit Kat Kafe in Monterey. I was an art student, so it all made sense. Our life on the high desert living off grid in the Tehachapi Mountains was very difficult, but we learned things by necessity that turned out to be the very things we have most enjoyed. The gift of silence. The ability to sense the time and weather. Spareness in all it's aspects. Generosity of spirit.

Beginning when we arrived in NYC in 1979 I started documenting the subtleties out our windows; our area being utterly deprived of anything growing, weather was determined by opening the window. Our road trips on the blue highways between NYC and Santa Cruz prompted my fence collections and “Filling Stations: Closed Down" series, reflections on loss of individuality and uniqueness when the relics I photographed are compared with today's mass formulations. “Mass Moca Ladies Restroom" was a chance occurrence, the end of the day, the museum mostly empty, the restroom completely empty, the empty and identical stalls revealed their temporary uniqueness. My sculptural stumps and trees, which are literal portraits, come from emotions prompted by close observation of their life cycles.

Family, Tehachapi CA 1965

Family, Tehachapi CA 1965

PERI SCHWARTZ + JOE WHEATON

SUMMER SHOW
Peri Schwartz + Joe Wheaton

SHOW OPENING: SATURDAY, AUGUST 10
R E C E P T I O N
Saturday, August 10th

4-6pm 4forART Gallery

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PERI SCHWARTZ

Peri Schwartz grew up in Far Rockaway, NY. She received her BFA from Boston University's School of Fine Arts and her MFA from Queens College. She lives and works in New Rochelle, NY. Her paintings, prints and drawings focus on composition and the interplay of color, light and space. Her work is in museum collections in the US and Europe.

JOE WHEATON

Familiar yet strange, beautiful yet menacing, threatening yet delicate. Reaching and solid, my work traverses many contradictions. As in life, beautiful lines have sharp edges, precarious forms balance with great certainty yet are vulnerable to nature's menacing ways. I am interested in using recognizable materials and relationships in configurations that will serve to re-evaluate how one perceives what might at first seem obvious. Dark forms stand in front of their ever-changing shadows. Lines motion and engage, but are like life, elusive and mysterious.

TOM PATTI: WORKS IN GLASS

TOM PATTI
Works in Glass
Saturday, July 27 - Friday, August 9, 2019
R E C E P T I O N
Saturday, July 27th 4-6pm
53 Church Street, Lenox, MA

4 For Art is pleased to present a selection of Tom Patti’s artwork. The featured artworks are part of a succession of works developed over a 30 year period that are all part of a search for aesthetic perfection – a process of creative evolution influenced by the other.

The artist brings the viewers into the work of art both spatially and emotionally. His works are confined by boundaries of edge and surface. The Plateau Tables, the compacted spatial OPUS Series and a major classic work from his ECHO Series maintain the same formal relationship of expanding space, surface and shape. Patti captures in his works the formal elements of line as plane and circle as ellipse, expanding our sense of peripheral vision and infinite space.

TABLES WITH BI-CHROMA GLASS

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OPUS SERIES

ECHO SERIES

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SCULPTURE: COLOR AND LINE

SCULPTURE: COLOR + LINE
Susan Rodgers + Hirofumi Maeshiba
SHOW OPENING SATURDAY JULY 13
R E C E P T I O N
Saturday, July 13th

4-5pm 4forART Gallery

5-6pm @ Artist's Studio [Sculptor: Susan Rodgers]

SUSAN RODGERS

ARTIST'S STATEMENT: "I know what I like. Not much. But I think what I take away may leave an echo. Which is something ...
A new friend, pointing to a chair in my studio, asked if that's where I sit to think. Without thinking I said "I don't think". Then not wanting to seem too flip, "it's more like waiting, or waiting for something that's already there that's waiting."


HIROFUMI MAESHIBA

EXCERPT: "Hirofumi Maeshiba works in wood... the intricate joinery serves as a living adaptation to the wood's resistance and pliability. Though built as static structures, they wind and twist in a choreography of reconfiguration. They remain organic, with little reliance on any mimicry of specific natural forms." - Peter Malone

3 MASTERS IN CERAMICS

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ANI KASTEN

"My latest ceramics reflect on pressing issues such as environmental collapse , social collapse, and inner and outer strife. Earth materials like clay provide such a perfect metaphor for exploring these ideas. In the act of building and creating, I want to find beauty and harmony in piecing back together seemingly meaningless detritus of a collapsing world, reclaiming a tenuous and fragile feeling of meaning and purpose."

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SALLY SILBERBERG

"From the earth, about the earth.
Porcelain Sculptures that link the energy of fabrication and heat with the vulnerability of time and erosion."

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STEVEN HEINEMANN

"The marriage of engaged passion and philosophical reflection in Heinemann's art has borne wise fruit, by calling into question of what we thought ceramic art is, or ought to be. Heinemann plays a high mental game with the volumes and masses of his tradition." Margaret Cannon , Thinking in Clay ,pp14-16 , Ontario Craft, July/August 96

AN INSPIRED CONVERSATION

Painter Bernd Haussmann and Sculptor Peter Bradley Cohen
SHOW OPENING SATURDAY, JUNE 15TH 4-6pm 
** The artists will be present at the opening.**

At its best, art is a feast for the eye as well as food for thought. Bernd Haussmann and Peter Bradley Cohen, painter and sculptor, offer both. Different media, same quest! In this exhibition each artist is dealing with illusions of size and space.

The sculptures by Cohen, seen by themselves, do not betray their size. They appear monumental, as if building blocks for Stonehenge. It is the title "Tiny Fetish" that gives away the scale. At the same time the word "Fetish" hints at the world of magic, of the spirit, the age-old desire for protection. It is meant to be an object to keep one company, to be coveted, cherished and to be carried around with oneself. 
 
So could the paintings by Bernd Haussmann be small or large. Words scribbled into the surface deliver messages evoking the intimacy of book pages, but combined with weighty geometric shapes and bold brushstrokes the paintings defy scale. Do the words and phrases carry important or protective meaning as a response to Cohen's implied meaning of fetish?  That is left for the viewer to decide.

Both artists use a limited palette. Haussmann uses rich shades of grey, reminiscent of grisaille, a technique traditionally employed to give the illusion of 3-dimensionality. A nod to the sculptor, his partner in this conversation?  Cohen chooses gold to emphasize the precious, jewel-like quality of his objects.

This back and forth conversation could be expanded upon endlessly. It is a challenge to extract personal meaning which, in the end, is what art is all about.

BERND HAUSSMANN

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#2779
Subjective environments
A picture exists in its own time
Its own reality
And equally and parallel in the time and reality of the viewer
At the moment of its viewing -
Within the viewer’s own reality
So a picture is a heteropia and
Also a Utopia (according to Foucault)
An external and internal space
Because the picture exists in its own time and space
And parallel, as a counteraction, to the position of the viewer
So a picture is a mirror and also a boat
And what is a window?

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#2799
No more ART

PETER BRADLEY COHEN

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Tiny Fetishes

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Tiny Fetish

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Tiny Fetishes

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Tiny Fetish

NONTRADITIONAL LANDSCAPES

Ever since the invention of photography the depiction of landscapes has opened up new possibilities for the artist. No longer is landscape a reflection of nature's multiple forms .


Concerns over pollution (Paul Scott) or environmental damage (Jan Henle) have become important motifs for some artists: or constant destruction, construction and change of a cityscape, as in Jongjae Kim's New York City street scene, have become important.

Others, such as Aboriginal artists, paint landscapes as markers of their tribal lands holding the keys to their mythology.

Sculptor Gene Flores demonstrates his respect for the grandeur of desert and canyons, where his family originates, by sculpting their elegant and simplified outlines in metal.

Last but not least, the moonscape by Trina Sears Sternstein steers away from the poetic to the mysterious, the unknown and unknowable.

This exhibition is meant to demonstrate the endless possibilities our contemporary world offers to artists where rules no longer restrict artistic expression.

VESSELS + BASKETS

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V E S S E L S + B A S K E T S E X H I B I T I O N
SATURDAY, MAY 18TH - FRIDAY, MAY 31ST

The art of basket making goes way back in time. We are showing a unique collection ranging from African to Aboriginal to Contemporary, baskets to be used as containers to baskets created as objets d'art. As the world has changed, so have the materials used as well, clearly identifying the culture they represent.

ABORIGINAL BASKETS